On China

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Reluctant Stakeholder: Why China’s Highly Strategic Brand of Revisionism is More Challenging Than Washington Thinks

MacroPolo

China and the World: Dealing with a Reluctant Power

Foreign Affairs

Trump and China

The National Interest

A Chinese Puzzle: Why Economic “Reform” in Xi’s China Has More Meanings than Market Liberalization

MacroPolo

The Big Bet at the Heart of Xi Jinping’s “New Deal”

MacroPolo

Lenin’s Chinese Heirs

Foreign Affairs

Federalism, Chinese-Style

Foreign Affairs

After the Plenum: Why China Must Reshape the State

Foreign Affairs

The Rise of China’s Reformers?

Foreign Affairs

After the 19th CCP Congress: What Happened, What Didn’t, and What Now?

MacroPolo

The Deep Roots and Long Branches of Chinese Technonationalism

MacroPolo

Risky Business, Chinese Style

MacroPolo

Is Coercion the New Normal in China’s Economic Statecraft

MacroPolo

China Didn’t Invent Asian Connectivity

MacroPolo

Obama Should Confront Xi on the South China Sea

Newsweek

How Should the U.S. Conduct the Xi Jinping State Visit?

ChinaFile

China Rebalancing_Eurasia Group

Eurasia Group (Special Report) 

Ten Trends That Will Shape Asia in 2014

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

China’s Techno-Warriors: National Security and Strategic Competition from the Nuclear to the Information Age

Stanford University Press Book – 2003

中共科技先驅 

Chinese language edition of China’s Techno-Warriors (Taipei) – 2006

Why America No Longer Gets Asia

The Washington Quarterly

A Tale of Two Asias

Foreign Policy

The Problem with Two Asias

East Asia Forum

China’s Pakistan Conundrum

Foreign Affairs

Understanding China’s Economic Challenge and Why It Matters

The Atlantic

Reluctant Warriors

Foreign Policy

The United States in the New Asia

Council on Foreign Relations Monograph – 2009

Beijing’s Billions

Foreign Policy

America Risks Being Left Behind in Asia

Financial Times

Can China Change its Growth Model?

The Atlantic

“Pauslon’s Principles” for the United States and China

The Atlantic

Does U.S.-China Strategic Cooperation Have To Be So Hard?

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Great Rebalancing Act

Council on Foreign Relations

What Will Vice President Biden Find in China?

Council on Foreign Relations

Who Will Win as China’s Economy Changes?

Council on Foreign Relations

Are Multilateral Groups Missing the Point

Council on Foreign Relations

Is China Eating Our Lunch?

Council on Foreign Relations

China Isn’t Egypt

Council on Foreign Relations

Hu Cometh

Council on Foreign Relations

Asia’s Business in 2010 — and 2011? Still Business!

Council on Foreign Relations

Inflation is Political Too

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Money — A Central Asian Tale

Council on Foreign Relations

U.S.-China Trade Conflict Is Here To Stay, But …

Council on Foreign Relations

In China, Where You Sit Is Where You Stand

Council on Foreign Relations

China Assaults the High-Tech Frontier

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Rise and the Contested Commons

Council on Foreign Relations

Chinese Politics: Not an Oxymoron!

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Tough Choices

Council on Foreign Relations

Thinking Through Beijing’s Billions

Council on Foreign Relations

America, Trade, and Asia

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Friends Indeed?

Council on Foreign Relations

Even If China Comes Around on Iran Sanctions

Council on Foreign Relations

Where’s the Tipping Point in U.S.-China Relations?

Council on Foreign Relations

Why Is U.S.-China Strategic Coordination So Hard?

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Big Play in Central Asia

Council on Foreign Relations

Asia and World (dis)Order

Council on Foreign Relations

China’s Great Rebalancing Act

Business Standard

Who Will Win As China’s Economy Changes?

Business Standard

Managing Instability on China’s Periphery

Council on Foreign Relations Monograph – 2011

Change in Taiwan and Potential Adversity in the Strait

RAND Monograph – 1995

Is China “Eating Our Lunch”?

Business Standard

Why U.S.-China Relations Will Get Tougher

Business Standard

Why We Aren’t China

Business Standard

Henry Paulson’s Five Ideas for U.S.-China Relations

The Atlantic

Watch Out for Rising U.S.-China Competition

Harvard Business Review

China’s Challenge to Pax Americana

The Washington Quarterly

Who’s Behind China’s High-Technology “Revolution”: How Bomb-Makers Remade Beijing’s Priorities, Policies, and Institutions

International Security

China’s Military Posture and the New Economic Geopolitics

Survival

Soldiers, Weapons, and Chinese Development Strategy: The Mao Era Military in China’s Economic and Institutional Debate

The China Quarterly

Patterns of Chinese Policies on Technology Transfer

Journal of American-East Asian Relations

Why Sino-U.S. Interdependence is not Enough

CNBC “The Call”

U.S.-China Trade Conflict is New Status Quo

CNBC “Squawk Box Asia”

China’s Reforms a Matter of Political Will

CNBC “The Call”

Economics and Security in Collision: An Interview with Evan A. Feigenbaum on Asia’s Future

Revue Le Banquet (Paris)

China’s Growth Model is Vulnerable

Bloomberg “Midday Surveillance” with Tom Keene

China’s Challenge to the United States

CNBC “Closing Bell” with Maria Bartiromo

China and Iran’s Nuclear Program

BBC “World News Tonight”

Obama To Offer More Talk Than Action on Asian Trade

Radio Australia “Connect Asia”

U.S. Needs Greater Engagement in Asia

Council on Foreign Relations Podcast

China’s Role in Central and South Asia, from “China 2025: China Goes Global”

         Part 1 

         Part 2

Council on Foreign Relations

The Shanghai Cooperation Organization Role in Afghanistan

Council on Foreign Relations Podcast

China-Pakistan Relations

Council on Foreign Relations Video Crisis Guide

Book Launch: Crouching Dragon, Hidden Tiger

Panel Discussion – Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

John Wilson Lewis: An 80th Birthday Celebration

Panel Discussion – Stanford University

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